It appears you are using an older browser. This site is optimized for modern browsers.
To get more out of your browsing experience upgrade your browser.

Adamic · Adichie · Alexander · Ali · Allen · Appiah · Asch · Bahnimptewa · Baldry · Banks · Bartlett · Baughman · Beckwith · Bell · Berlin · Berry · Blight · Braithwaite · Branch · Breytenbach · Bronfenbrenner · Brooks · Brown · Brown · Carter · Carter · Cayton · Chase · Chin · Cisneros · Clifton · Cofer · Cohn · Coles · Collier · Collins · Conroy · Dahlstrom · Danticat · Davidson · Davis · Dawidowicz · Dean · Deloria Jr. · Demby · Derricotte · Díaz · Dinnerstein · Dobzhansky · Downs · Drake · Duguid · Dumond · Dunn · Edugyan · Ellison · Eltis · Erdrich · Fabre · Faderman · Fernandes · Field · Fineberg · Fisher · Fladeland · Foxx · Franch · Franklin · Frazier · Fredrickson · Freyre · Furnas · Gaines · Gates Jr. · Genovese · Gibbons · Gibbs · Gimbutas · Girdner · Glazer · Gloria · Gordimer · Gordon · Gordon-Reed · Gosnell · Graham · Graham · Greene · Griffin · Haddon · Haley · Haller Jr. · Hamid · Harris · Hayes, ed. · Hedden · Hersey · Highwater · Hilberg · Holmes · Honour · Huddleston · Hughes · Hunt · Hurston · Huxley · Infeld · Isaacs · Jackson · James · Jones · Jones · Jordan · Jordan Jr. · July · Kahler · Kelley · Kendrick · Kennedy · Kibbe · Kiernan · Kincaid · King Jr. · Kingston · Kluger · Kozol · Krauss · Laming · Le · LeBlanc · Lee · Lee · Lepore · Levine · Lewis · Lewis · Lewis · Leyburn · Lipsitz · Loftis · Lomax · Loye · Lurie · Mabee · Marra · Marshall · Matejka · McBride · McPherson · Meeker · Mensh · Mensh · Mokgatle · Morris · Morris Jr. · Morrison · Mosley · Mowat · Moynihan · Murray · Myrdal · Nelli · Nelson · North · Olson · Ottley · Parks · Patai · Paton · Patterson · Phillips · Poliakov · Powell · Power · Powers · Rainwater · Rampersad · Richardson · Robinson · Rodriguez · Rosen · Sachar · Sachs · Said · Saitoti · Sams · Samuel · Saunders · Scheinfeld · Seibert · Shamsie · Shavit · Sheehy · Shepherd Jr. · Silver · Simpson · Smith · Smith · Snyder · Solomon · South African Institute of Race Relations · Soyinka · Staples · Stefaniak · Stegner with the editors of Look · Steiner · Sutton · Suyin · Takaki · Thernstrom · Tobias, ed. · Toole · Tucker · van der Post · Vazirani · Walcott · Wallace · Waniek · Ward · Weglyn · West · Whitehead · Wideman · Wilkerson · Wilson · Wilson · Winfrey · Wing · Wood · Wright · Wright · Wyman · X · Yinger

Tag Archives: racism

“I’m Not Racist” Documentary Features Millennial Views On Privilege, Power And Identity

Students don new identities while playing the board game, "American Dream"In one compelling segment from the 2014 documentary, "I'm Not Racist...Am I?" high school students huddle around a board game modeled loosely after the game "Life."This one is called "American Dream."To play, each student takes on an identity different from their own. So a young black student is now a middle-class white male; a white peer is now a lower-class Asian woman. As they move the pieces around the board, players hear instructions that begin to heavily favor a certain demographic: "All females lose one turn" follows "LGBT players move back one space," which follows “All welfare recipients move back five spaces.”  At the end, the young black student -- playing the game as a white male -- threw up his... Read More →

REVIEW: Alison Kinney’s “Hood” Offers Lesson On The Garment That Made Headlines

In March 2012, U.S. Representative Bobby Rush stood on the House floor dressed in a gray hooded sweatshirt, one month after Trayvon Martin was shot dead in a Florida suburb. "Just because someone wears a hoodie, does not make them a hoodlum," said the Illinois Democrat. "Just because someone is a young Black male and wears a hoodie does not make them a hoodlum. . ." He was escorted off the floor and out of the chamber by the sergeant-in-arms for violating decorum. Author Alison Kinney begins her "Hood" – publishing this week -- with this telling moment. Part of the publisher Bloombury's "Object Lessons" series, "Hood" contains a definite chill as Kinney tracks the history and significance of the garment through the 15th century to the present. "We all wear hoods," Kinney writes, "but... Read More →

[VIDEO] Marlon James: We All Have A Stake In Ending Racism

Marlon James begins his 2-minute video on racism with the following question: "Are you 'non' or are you 'anti'?" Published by the Guardian and viewed more than 10 million times, the video asks viewers to grapple with their own sense of personal responsibility when it comes to dismantling white supremacy. James broke down his thoughts on non-racism vs. anti-racism when he spoke at the Cleveland City Club September 12. Here is a handy video recap of his point to share with friends: Read More →

Why I Teach Feminism At An Urban High School

by Sarah Marcus Like many of my days spent teaching, today feels hard, but important. By 10 a.m. I've already had some awesome, small victories. A student ran upstairs 10 minutes before class to make sure that he understood what the word "vixen" meant and wanted to discuss if he could use it in a feminist context within his "Be A Man" poem. He told me that this felt like the biggest and most important question that he had all year. He caught the bus early so that he could be at school early to talk to me about it. The "Be A Man/Woman" poem assignment originated from a powerful in-class discussion that we had about gender and masculinity. In my 12th Grade Creative Writing Class, largely due to the influence and materials of one of my incredible mentors, Daniel Gray Kontar, we have... Read More →

New Documentary Uncovers The Worst Racial Violence In United States History

Destruction of Tulsa's wealthy black district during the 1921 race riot. "Why are we addicted to hate in America?" That was the simple, provocative question of Rachel Lyon, as she introduced her 2014 documentary to a crowd at the Cleveland Museum of Art. “Hate Crimes in the Heartland" spends an hour exploring two separate, racially motivated killings that occurred nearly a century apart.  The film begins in Tulsa, Oklahoma, following the April 2012 "Good Friday shootings" that took three lives and critically injured two others. Two young men -- one white, the other Native American -- drove around the city, opening fire on groups of black people. The random slaughter attracted national media attention and stirred the ghosts of another racial atrocity -- the 1921 Tulsa race... Read More →

Comedian W. Kamau Bell Single-Handedly Ends Racism In Comedic Set At John Carroll University

"When we talk about race, we tend to use words that make us comfortable," comedian W. Kamau Bell told a crowd assembled at John Carroll University. "Words like 'minority,' 'Caucasion,' 'colorblind.'" He paused. "We won't be using any of those words tonight."  Dressed in a button-down shirt and dark pants, Bell paced leisurely in front of roughly 200 students, community members and administrators as he presented "The W. Kamau Bell Curve," the keynote of the university's Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. celebration. His talk -- subtitled "Ending Racism In About An Hour" -- was born of frustration in 2007. Bell's comedy career was stalled, so he rented a theater in San Francisco to present a one-man show. It would be easier, in Bell's estimation, to talk about race in a theater than a... Read More →

Cleveland Teens Add Their Voices To Conversation On Racism, Injustice

Moderator Anthony Price of Shaw High School; Shakyra Diaz of the ACLU of Ohio; Jonathan Gordon of CWRU School of Law; Basheer Jones, writer and poet; Andres Gonzalez, chief of police of the Cuyahoga Metropolitan Housing Authority Shakyra Diaz, policy manager for the ACLU of Ohio, asked everyone in a crowded meeting hall who knew someone with a criminal conviction to raise a hand.  Almost every person – mostly youth – lifted an arm overhead. This was a respectable crowd – a City Club of Cleveland forum – and the arms aloft were eloquent. “The land of the free cannot be the land of the lock down,” Diaz said, and a junior at Gilmour Academy jotted the sentence in pencil on her program. The note-taking at “A Conversation on Race” at the City Club youth forum was no... Read More →

Civil Rights Leader Rev. Dr. Otis Moss Jr. Calls For “Deliberate Action” At City Club Of Cleveland

Two elders of the American Civil Rights movement—Rev. Dr. Otis Moss Jr. and  Rev. Dr. Joan Brown Campbell—went before a sold-out Cleveland crowd to consider “the unfinished business of race,” a topic heightened by the November police killing of Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old playing with a toy gun in a city park. Photo Credit: Donn Nottage “Tamir Rice was our child, Cleveland’s child, God’s child,” Moss said at the City Club of Cleveland, “and every parent should feel the loss.” Dr. Rhonda Williams, director of the Social Justice Institute at Case Western Reserve University, came directly to her point: “How do we dismantle white privilege?” Moss, 79, who counseled U.S. presidents Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama, said the movement makes the most progress... Read More →

New Crowd-Funded Film Explores America’s “White Privilege” Problem

Thanks to generous supporters on the crowd-funding site Kickstarter, anti-racism activist Tim Wise has raised more than $41,000 for a feature film adaptation of his 2008 book, "White Like Me: Reflections On Race From A Privileged Son." A frequent MSNBC guest and lecturer, Wise, 44, has crisscrossed the country to discuss white privilege, racial bias, and discrimination. He wants the film to further the national conversation on race, specifically what it means to be white in this country. "We live with the legacy of inequality," Wise says in the trailer, "but also the legacy of obliviousness that allows those in the dominant group to rarely even think about these matters." The film is enhanced by an impressive list of scholars, including Princeton's Imani Perry; Michelle Alexander, who... Read More →

“Staring In The Mirror”: Prejudice, Biases and Fighting Human Nature

by Sally Wiener Grotta A recent Anisfield-Wolf blog post asked, “What Biases Are You Carrying?” In the blog, Attorney Louise P. Dempsey  used the following riddle as part of a lunch talk: A man and his son were in a car accident. The critically injured man had to be helicoptered to the hospital. His son was rushed by ambulance to the same hospital. When the boy was wheeled into emergency surgery, the surgeon looked at him and said, “I can’t operate. This is my son.” The blog then asked the question, “How is this possible?” If you haven’t heard that anecdotal test before, consider your answer for a few moments before continuing to read. I’ve seen the riddle before. So, I knew the answer. Of course, the surgeon was his mother. But even steadfast feminists... Read More →
↑ Back to Top