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Monthly Archives: July 2015

REVIEW: Tamara Winfrey Harris Lends Depth To Black Womanhood In “The Sisters Are Alright”

About a year ago, I noticed a number of black women I follow online all wearing the same "Black Girls are Magic" t-shirt in their social media profiles. Launched by @ThePBG on Twitter, the t-shirt line was created in "celebration of the beauty, intelligence and power of Black women everywhere." It's not hard to imagine those magical black women nestled somewhere reading journalist Tamara Winfrey Harris' first book, 'The Sisters Are Alright: Changing the Broken Narrative of Black Women in America." Her thesis is that black women are "neither innately damaged nor fundamentally flawed," but instead are aching to be recognized for their full humanity.  So what is Winfrey Harris pushing back against? In a brisk 123 pages, the Indiana native investigates the "three-headed hydra" of black... Read More →

Meet Our 2015 Winners In And Around Cleveland This September

Anisfield-Wolf award winners are—almost by definition—civic minded. They continue a generous tradition of adding extra public conversations each September in Cleveland. For those readers whose schedules don’t allow them to attend the awards ceremony or who want more than one chance to hear these gifted writers, here are the details: Poet Marilyn Chin, a professor at San Diego State University, will read and discuss her work in Hard Love Province.  She will appear alongside John Carroll University’s Phil Metres, whose recent book, Sand Opera, has also drawn national honors. Both writers ponder identity, culture and Diaspora. They will appear at noon Wednesday, September 9 in the atrium of MOCA Cleveland, 11400 Euclid Ave.     Historian Richard S. Dunn will give a... Read More →

REVIEW: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ “Between The World And Me” Is A Blunt Examination Of Black Life In America

Coates with his son Somari When a Missouri grand jury decided not to indict police officer Darren Wilson for killing 18-year-old Michael Brown, journalist Ta-Nehisi Coates watched his 15-year-old son Samori slowly stand up and walk into his own Baltimore bedroom to cry. As Coates recounts this story in Between the World and Me, he writes that he followed his son, but did not hug or console him: "I did not tell you it would be okay, because I have never believed it would be okay. What I told you is what your grandparents tried to tell me: that this is your country, that this is your world, that this is your body, and you must find some way to live within all of it." Originally conceived as a collection of essays on the Civil War, Between the World and Me arrived four months ahead of its... Read More →

New Nina Simone Documentary Introduces You To The Artist You Thought You Knew

"I'll tell you what freedom is to me—no fear," Nina Simone wistfully told an interviewer in 1968. "If I could have that half of my life..." This search for freedom haunts each beat of "What Happened, Miss Simone," the new Netflix-commissioned documentary on the award-winning singer, pianist and activist. The film, book-ended by Simone singing her classic "I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel To Be Free," traces her journey from a piano prodigy in small town North Carolina to an international force of blues and soul. "What Happened, Miss Simone" reaches viewers months before the highly controversial "Nina" biopic—in which Afro-Latina actress Zoe Saldana dons facial prosthetics to more closely resemble Simone. Simone's only child, Broadway actress Lisa Simone Kelly, prefers the documentary... Read More →
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