It appears you are using an older browser. This site is optimized for modern browsers.
To get more out of your browsing experience upgrade your browser.

Adamic · Adichie · Alexander · Ali · Allen · Allende · Appiah · Asch · Bahnimptewa · Baldry · Banks · Bartlett · Baughman · Beckwith · Bell · Berlin · Berry · Blight · Braithwaite · Branch · Breytenbach · Bronfenbrenner · Brooks · Brown · Brown · Bunche · Carter · Carter · Cayton · Chase · Chin · Cisneros · Clifton · Cofer · Cohn · Coles · Collier · Collins · Conroy · Dahlstrom · Danticat · Davidson · Davies · Davis · Dawidowicz · Dean · Deloria Jr. · Demby · Derricotte · Díaz · Dinnerstein · Dobzhansky · Downs · Drake · Duguid · Dumond · Dunn · Edugyan · Ellison · Eltis · Erdrich · Fabre · Faderman · Fernandes · Field · Fineberg · Fisher · Fladeland · Foxx · Franch · Franklin · Frazier · Fredrickson · Freyre · Furnas · Gaines · Gates Jr. · Genovese · Gibbons · Gibbs · Gimbutas · Girdner · Glazer · Gloria · Gordimer · Gordon · Gordon-Reed · Gosnell · Graham · Graham · Greene · Griffin · Haddon · Haley · Haller Jr. · Hamid · Harris · Hayes, ed. · Hedden · Hersey · Highwater · Hilberg · Holmes · Honour · Huddleston · Hughes · Hunt · Hurston · Huxley · Infeld · Isaacs · Jackson · James · Jess · Johnson · Jones · Jones · Jordan · Jordan Jr. · July · Kahler · Kelley · Kendrick · Kennedy · Kibbe · Kiernan · Kincaid · King Jr. · Kingston · Kluger · Kozol · Krauss · Laming · Le · LeBlanc · Lee · Lee · Lepore · Levine · Lewis · Lewis · Lewis · Leyburn · Lipsitz · Loftis · Lomax · Loye · Lurie · Mabee · Mahajan · Marra · Marshall · Matejka · McBride · McPherson · Meeker · Mensh · Mensh · Mokgatle · Morris · Morris Jr. · Morrison · Mosley · Mowat · Moynihan · Murray · Myrdal · Nelli · Nelson · North · Olson · Ottley · Parks · Patai · Paton · Patterson · Phillips · Poliakov · Powell · Power · Powers · Rainwater · Rampersad · Richardson · Robinson · Rodriguez · Rosen · Sachar · Sachs · Said · Saitoti · Sams · Samuel · Saunders · Scheinfeld · Seibert · Shamsie · Shavit · Sheehy · Shepherd Jr. · Shetterly · Silver · Simpson · Smith · Smith · Snyder · Solomon · South African Institute of Race Relations · Soyinka · Staples · Stefaniak · Stegner with the editors of Look · Steiner · Sutton · Suyin · Takaki · Thernstrom · Tobias, ed. · Toole · Tucker · van der Post · Vazirani · Walcott · Wallace · Waniek · Ward · Weglyn · West · Whitehead · Wideman · Wilkerson · Wilson · Wilson · Winfrey · Wing · Wood · Wright · Wright · Wyman · X · Yinger

Monthly Archives: April 2014

“Half Of A Yellow Sun” Nigerian Release Delayed By Censors

Two weeks after Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and Chiwetel Ejiofor walked the red carpet at the Lagos premiere of "Half Of A Yellow Sun," the Nigerian Film and Video Censors Board has halted its theatrical release in Nigeria. The screen adaptation of Adichie's 2006 novel premiered in September 2013 at the Toronto Film Festival. The film stars Thandie Newton (Crash) and Anika Noni Rose (Dreamgirls) as two sisters caught in the middle of the Nigerian-Biafran War. One million people died as a result of the conflict.  Hear from the director Biyi Bandele in this brief interview from BBC Africa on why he believes the board has blocked the release of the film:   listen to ‘Nigeria delays Biafran war film’ on Audioboo  The film will be available in limited release for selected U.S... Read More →

“The Best Book Describing the South” That Most Have Never Read

Nate Shaw, 22, with his wife and young daughter in 1907. When Theodore Rosengarten won the National Book Award in 1975 for "All God's Dangers: The Life of Nate Shaw," he beat out a classic of nonfiction, Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward's "All the President's Men," at the height of the Watergate scandal.  Forty years later, general readers tend to know “All the President’s Men” while Rosengarten’s work is obscure. Now the New York Times has drawn fresh attention to “All God’s Dangers” in "Lost in Literary History: A Tale of Courage in the South." (Read full story here.)  The book began simply -- as a conversation. In 1968, Rosengarten accompanied his future wife, Dale, on a trip to Alabama for research on her senior thesis, an examination of the Sharecroppers Union of the... Read More →

Do You Have Your Ticket To The African-American Philanthropy Summit? #GivingHasNoColor

Twenty years ago, Charlotte-based consultant Valaida Fullwood encountered philanthropy close to home. Her 70-year-old aunt, Dora Atlas, right around the corner from retirement, began a new project: serving free meals to residents in a public housing community in Asheboro, North Carolina.  Now in her 90s, Aunt Dora's soup kitchen is still operating. Fullwood tells this story in her book, "Giving Back: A Tribute to Generations of African American Philanthropists," which praises the legacy of everyday givers in black households.  Fullwood knows the legacy is impressive. Each year, African-Americans allocate a higher percentage of their income to charity than other racial groups. Yet, most hesitate to label themselves "philanthropists," a term more closely associated with the... Read More →

Even After Brandeis University Dispute, Advocate Ayaan Hirsi Ali Won’t Be Silenced

The feminist writer Ayaan Hirsi Ali lived out a new chapter of her controversial public life this month when Brandeis University abruptly withdrew its offer to bestow on her an honorary doctorate in May. "She is a compelling public figure and advocate for women's rights, and we respect and appreciate her work to protect and defend the rights of women and girls throughout the world," said the university's press release. "That said, we cannot overlook certain of her past statements that are inconsistent with Brandeis University's core values." To some, the 44-year-old activist is a profile in courage, standing up to the misogyny that afflicts many Muslim women.  To others, she is a shocking Islamophobe, mistakenly attributing her personal hardship to one of the three Abrahamic... Read More →

For Janet Mock, Storytelling Serves As Activism For The Transgender Community

In early February, Facebook rolled out 56 new gender identities for user profiles. Selections such as "pangender" and "two-spirit" now drop-down in a list that gives users more ways to describe themselves. When she heard the news, transgender advocate Janet Mock, 30, sent out a simple "Yeeesss" on Twitter. Over the past three years, Mock has been increasingly visible and unapologetic about her goals: to provide more spaces for the trans community to be open about their stories and their identities. Hers began 30 years ago in Hawaii and continued during her teen years in Oakland, Cal. She was the first member of her family to attend college, graduating with degrees from the University of Hawaii and New York University. In 2011, Mock publicly proclaimed her identity as a transgender... Read More →

A Look Back At The Rwandan Genocide: 20 Years Later, What Have We Learned?

This spring, as Rwanda commemorates the 1994 genocide that extinguished more than a million of its citizens, a nation assesses its reconstruction while the wider world wrestles with the fact that it stood by. Several important books illuminate these tasks.  "Twenty years ago today our country fell into deep ditches of darkness," said Louise Mushikiwabo, Rwanda’s current minister of foreign affairs. "Twenty years later, today, we are a country united and a nation elevated." Economic progress and a fragile peace characterize Rwanda now, under a new Constitution and a marked ascendancy of women into leadership.  A moving photographic portrait of the hard work of reconciliation is newly published in the New York Times. “The story of U.S. policy during the genocide in Rwanda is not a... Read More →

Henry Louis Gates Jr. Wins Peabody Award For “Many Rivers To Cross” Documentary

Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr.— who served as executive producer, host, and writer for "The African-Americans: Many Rivers to Cross" —learned this week that his six-part documentary won the highest honor in broadcasting: a Peabody Award. "This is a great victory of all of us that love African-American history and those of us that want to see it become an explicably intertwined part of American culture," Gates said in a statement on TheRoot.com. "This took five years and is a great victory for our ancestors and their sacrifices, and they should be celebrated every day in a school curriculum, and my hope is that the DVD will be used in every classroom from kindergarten to college." For the first time in its 73 year history, the Peabodys were announced live on television. CBS This... Read More →

New Poetry Collection From Kevin Powers Places War’s Aftermath In Verse

“Letter Composed During a Lull in the Fighting” publishes this week, the first collection of poetry from Anisfield-Wolf fiction winner Kevin Powers. Here is the title poem: I tell her I love her like not killing or ten minutes of sleep beneath the low rooftop wall on which my rifle rests. I tell her in a letter that will stink, when she opens it, of bolt oil and burned powder and the things it says. I tell her that Private Bartle says, offhand, that war is just us making little pieces of metal pass through each other. Powers, who grew up in Richmond, Va., enlisted the day after he turned 17. He served as a U.S. Army machine gunner in Mosul and Tal Afar, Iraq, in 2004 and 2005. Those years informed “The Yellow Birds,” a first novel that writer Tom Wolfe called “the... Read More →

Library Journal Features 2014 Anisfield-Wolf Winners

As our profile begins to grow as a book award, from time to time we like to recognize some of the beautiful writing others have done on our behalf. Barbara Hoffert, past president of the National Book Critics Circle, authored an elegant write-up about this year’s winners for the Library Journal, aptly titled, "Celebrate the Past, Look to the Future."  Since their founding in 1935 by Cleveland poet and philanthropist Edith Anisfield Wolf to honor books that confront racism and celebrate diversity, the Anisfield-Wolf Book Awards have called out major writers to us, among them Nadine Gordimer, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Toni Morrison, Wole Soyinka, and Derek Walcott—generally before they became Nobel Laureates.... From Israel to the Caribbean, Chechnya to the boxing rings of... Read More →
↑ Back to Top