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Tag Archives: The Warmth of Other Suns

How Books@Work Program Allowed Readers To See Themselves In Isabel Wilkerson’s “The Warmth Of Other Suns”

by Rachel Burstein Our experience of a book can be changed—and enriched—when we read it alongside people who are different from us. That’s the verdict from participants at a recent Books@Work program in Cleveland. The group read The Warmth of Other Suns from Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Isabel Wilkerson. Her meticulously researched and beautifully told history of the Great Migration won a 2011 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award. Books@Work is a non-profit organization that brings professor-led literature seminars into the workplace and to a variety of community settings. Few participants in a recent seminar were prepared for how profoundly reading and discussing Isabel Wilkerson’s book would hit them. Many recognized elements of their own family history in the book, causing them to... Read More →

“Warmth Of Other Suns” Named The 2013 Selection For Chicago’s City-Wide Book Club

With so much negative news spilling out of Chicago each day, we're happy to see at least one bright spot among the tragedies. Isabel WIlkerson's 2010 work "The Warmth of Other Suns" was named the next selection of the Chicago Public Library's "One Book, One  Chicago" program, announced by Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel on Monday.  Of the selection Emanuel said:  “Isabel Wilkerson’s book brings to life the stories of African Americans who left their homes in the South in search of a better life. These are the stories of people who helped create the Chicago we know today – and of people continuing to come to our city each day in hopes of finding their dream. Each of us has a story to tell about our family’s path to Chicago and how we all helped to make Chicago the most... Read More →

Would You Like To See Your Relatives As The Subject Of A Book?

Isabel Wilkerson's 2010 masterpiece The Warmth of Other Suns focuses on the Great Migration, scores of Southern African Americans who packed up and left everything they knew behind for a brighter future in the North. With painstaking detail, Wilkerson recounts the lives of four African Americans and their dreams awaiting them in a new place. It was a difficult journey for most, with countless hardships along the way. One of the subjects profiled, Robert Foster, made his way to medical school, becoming a surgeon and later opening his own private practice.  His daughter, Bunny Foster, sat down with Isabel Wilkerson in the research stage of the book to share her memories of her father. In a recent interview, she talked about how the man she remembered is different (in a good way) from the... Read More →

VIDEO: 2011 Anisfield-Wolf Winner Isabel Wilkerson On Writing: “Plunge Yourself Into It”

In this brief interview from Knopf's "Writers on Writing" series, 2011 Anisfield-Wolf winner Isabel Wilkerson discusses the lengthy, grueling process of writing her award-winning book, The Warmth of Other Suns. She says, "I am so glad that I didn't know it would take 15 years. Had I know it would take 15 years, I don't think I would have embarked upon it." See Knopf's full series of informational interviews with some of today's best writers here. Read More →
  • 2019 Winners Announced

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