The world of publishing is changing right before our eyes, with established authors choosing to go the self-publishing route. Anisfield-Wolf’s very own John Edgar Wideman chose to self-publish his collection of short stories, Briefs, with Lulu.com in 2010. Check out this video of young actor Theron Cook giving a steady performance of one of his stories, “Bananas.”

David Eltis, Woodruff Professor of History at Emory University, along with his co-author David Richardson, has complied one of the most exhaustive works on the subject of the Atlantic slave trade. Their ground-breaking work was turned into the website, www.SlaveVoyages.org, where visitors can get estimates of the slave trade, research African names, and get detailed maps regarding the passage of slaves from one country to another. Check out this short clip for more information on the project.

Thinking about picking up a book from one of the 2011 Anisfield-Wolf winners? Check out this brief reading from Mary Helen Stefaniak and see if her 2010 novel, The Cailiffs of Baghdad, Georgia, might make its way onto your Christmas list.

2011 Anisfield-Wolf Award winner Nicole Krauss, honored for her 2010 novel Great House, was selected as one of 12 honorees of USA Network’s Character Approved award. Here she speaks in this short clip about her approach to writing and how she doesn’t view it as simply putting words to paper, but rather, it’s more like architecture.

In this brief interview from Knopf’s “Writers on Writing” series, 2011 Anisfield-Wolf winner Isabel Wilkerson discusses the lengthy, grueling process of writing her award-winning book, The Warmth of Other Suns. She says, “I am so glad that I didn’t know it would take 15 years. Had I know it would take 15 years, I don’t think I would have embarked upon it.”

See Knopf’s full series of informational interviews with some of today’s best writers here.