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Tag Archives: Americanah

VIDEO: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie On Becoming Black: “This Identity Was Weighted With Stereotypes”

"When you're not born in the U.S. and you're a person of African descent, in some ways identifying as black becomes a political choice," novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie told Tavis Smiley during a recent appearance on his PBS show. "I'm very happily black."  Adichie was on hand to discuss her most recent novel, Americanah, now available in paperback. A love story that spans three continents, Americanah is about many things—with race and immigration at the forefront.   "I wanted to write about a kind of immigration that is familiar to me," Adichie said. "When we hear about Africans emigrating, we think of people who have run away from burned villages and war and poverty. And that story is important to tell but it's not the story I know. I wanted to talk about the Africa I know... Read More →

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Launches Real-Life “Americanah” Blog

Last year, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie created Ifemelu, the protagonist and blogger in her novel “Americanah,” one of the smartest and sharpest chronicles of contemporary life on three continents. Now, readers can catch up with Ifemelu through "The Small Redemptions of Lagos," at AmericanahBlog.com. This new blog focuses on Ifemelu's life in Nigeria, a kind of younger sibling to the novel’s incendiary and anonymous blog, “Raceteenth or Various Observations about American Blacks (Those Formerly Known as Negros) by a Non-American Black.” The new installment is no less expressive. Ifemelu's observations are piercing, even on such subjects as a leaky roof at a Lagos airport or a friend who needs to take better care of herself: "Don’t expect water to taste like Coke. It is not Coke... Read More →

REVIEW: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Soars With “Americanah”

Americanah Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Knopf, 477 pp., $26.95 Hair asserts itself on the first page of “Americanah,” a knowing, prickly and virtuosic novel from Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. She was 29 when she won an Anisfield-Wolf award in 2007 for “Half of a Yellow Sun”; she picked up a MacArthur Foundation “genius” grant the following year. Her mother, a Nigerian university registrar, likes to say little Chimamanda started to read when she was 2. The writer herself thinks it was probably around age 4. “Americanah” wears its genius lightly, starting with a pleasurable and assured set-up chapter that puts its central character Ifemelu on a train from Princeton to Trenton, N.J. Her mission: to have her hair braided. After 13 years stateside, most recently on a fellowship to... Read More →
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