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Tag Archives: Toni Morrison

VIDEO: Toni Morrison Discusses “Black Is Beautiful”

We've been talking about Toni Morrison a lot lately, but we think it's difficult to provide too much information on one of our greatest living writers. Bookriot named May 8 "Toni Morrison Day," in honor of the release of her newest book, but we're going to extend it one day and share one more video of the great Ms. Morrison. In it, she discusses the early part of her career and what she thought of the "Black is Beautiful" movement.  Read More →

Does Toni Morrison’s Latest Stack Up Against Her Previous Works?

It's not very likely to hear us expressing doubt about Ms. Toni Morrison's literary abilities. If anything, our appreciation for her craft only grows larger with the release of each new work. Her latest novel, Home, explores the homecoming of Frank Money, a Korean War vet who signed up for the service to get away from his hometown, only to return weary and disturbed and not sure of how welcome he will be. The reviews are in—is this still the Toni Morrison we all know and love?   New York Daily News:  Toni Morrison’s new novel “Home” is a slim volume. That alone excuses it from providing the sweeping exhilaration of “Beloved” or “Song of Solomon.” But “Home” is also a lesser novel — still powerful, still moving, but not her best work. San Francisco... Read More →

Toni Morrison On Herself: “The Only Thing I Do For Me Is Writing”

In anticipation for Toni Morrison's latest novel, Home, following the story of a Korean War veteran and his return to America in the 1950s, New York magazine wrote one of the best pieces on Toni Morrison that we've ever read. In it, writer Boris Kachka examine her feelings on her pen name (Surprise! She hates it), whether she believes her writing is as good as other people say it is (she does) and much, much more. We've lifted some of the best excerpts and encourage you to read the full piece. It's extraordinary:  On whether she deserves to be listed among the all-time greats, regardless of skin color: But two decades after she won her Nobel, Toni Morrison’s place in the pantheon is hardly assured. A writer of smaller ambitions would live on contentedly in this plush purgatory,... Read More →

New Books From Junot Diaz, Toni Morrison, and Zadie Smith

Junot Díaz Junot Diaz's short story collection This Is How You Lose Her will be published in September. It's Diaz's first book since his 2007 debut novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, which, in addition to the 2008 Anisfield-Wolf award for fiction, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and National Book Critics Circle Award. {New York Times} It hasn't been officially confirmed but the rumor mill is buzzing that Zadie Smith's latest book will be released in September. No doubt fans of White Teeth and On Beauty are waiting anxiously. {Sarah Weinman} Toni Morrison's 10th novel, Home, will be released May 8. It follows an African American Korean war veteran who returns to his Georgia community a changed man. {L.A. Times} Read More →

Friday Lit Review: Things You Might Have Missed When You Were Busy Living Life

Each Friday we'll be bringing you news about your favorite authors, literature and books in general. Check out the first installment and tell us what you think in the comments:  Isabel Wilkerson (2011 winner) was on PBS Newshour to discuss the groundbreaking of the Smithsonian's African-American History Museum. See her part at the 4:00 minute mark.    Our friends over at Book Riot have declared May 8 "Toni Morrison Day" based off the release date of Ms. Morrison's (1998 winner) newest book, Home. One of their writers will be re-reading her entire catalog and will be blogging about the experience.   Paule Marshall (2009 winner) will be doing a reading during the 2012 Harlem Jazz Shrines Festival, scheduled for May 7-13.    New York has tons of payphones but... Read More →

Spend “An Evening With Toni Morrison” At Oberlin College March 14

Oberlin College will host 1988 Anisfield-Wolf award winner Toni Morrison in an intimate event on Wednesday, March 14 at 7:30. The Nobel-prize winning author will read from her upcoming novel, Home, as well as participate in a question-and-answer session. The public can request tickets by sending a self-addressed stamped envelope along with your request to: Central Ticket ServiceHall Auditorium67 N. Main St.Oberlin, OH 44074   If you have the opportunity to go, we highly recommend you take the time to see Ms. Morrison in person. In the meantime, check out this reading Toni Morrison delivered in late 2011, at George Washington University: Read More →

6 Quotes From Your Favorite Authors

Ernest J. Gaines‎Because it is more appealing to hear from the authors themselves, we've rounded up some of the best quotes we've heard this year (even if they're a bit older) from some of our distinguished Anisfield-Wolf Award winners. Enjoy!  "I want you to show them the difference between what they think you are and what you can be." — Ernest J. Gaines, A Lesson Before Dying ‎"At some point in life the world's beauty becomes enough. You don't need to photograph, paint or even remember it. It is enough." — Toni Morrison ‎"Art, after all, is - at its best - a lie that tells us the truth." — Nam Le ‎"Poetry is what you find / in the dirt in the corner, / overhear on the bus, God / in the details, the only way / to get from here to there."  — Elizabeth Alexander, Ars... Read More →

Chairing the Jury

Chairing the jury for the Anisfield-Wolf Book Awards is one of the single pleasures of my life. The thought that a poet – a white, female poet – had the foresight to endow a prize to honor excellence and diversity, at the height of the Great Depression, is something of a miracle, isn't it? And in a few days, we will honor her commitment to racial equality and justice by recognizing this year's winners of her prize, the 76th such occasion. It is humbling to thumb through the names of previous winners, including Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, and three Nobel laureates, Wole Soyinka, Toni Morrison, and Derek Walcott. God bless Edith Anisfield Wolf, and the Cleveland Foundation for so judiciously protecting her legacy. Read More →

Cuyahoga County Public Library Celebrates Anisfield-Wolf

The Anisfield-Wolf book prize 75th anniversary celebration is in full swing at Cuyahoga County Public Library. Since January, Library staff members have facilitated lively discussions of books by Anisfield-Wolf book prize-winning authors in each of the Library’s 28 branches. Special Anisfield-Wolf book discussion series held in the Library’s Bay Village (502 Cahoon Road / 440.871.6392), Beachwood (25501 Shaker Boulevard / 216.831.6868) and Parma Heights (6206 Pearl Road / 440.884.2313) branches have been extremely popular. Each month, book clubs meet at these branches to engage in thought-provoking discussions of books by Anisfield-Wolf book prize-winners. Past discussion titles have included: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz; Infidel by Ayaan Hirsi Ali; and The... Read More →
  • 2019 Winners Announced

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