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Tag Archives: NPR

“What I’ve Left Unsaid”: NPR’s Michel Martin On Balancing Career And Family As A Woman Of Color

Two months ago, NPR announced the cancellation of "Tell Me More," the daily news show hosted by veteran journalist Michel Martin. It is the third show developed for an African-American audience to be axed by NPR in the past decade. ("News & Notes" went off the air in 2009 and the Tavis Smiley Show departed in 2004.) On Friday, Tell Me More will broadcast its last show. Martin will stay on with NPR as a producer, along with Tell Me More's executive producer, Carline Watson. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Martin has worked for the Washington Post, ABC News and the Wall Street Journal as its White House correspondent. She won an Emmy for her Nightline reporting. In hosting "Tell Me More," she focused on religion, race and spirituality. In an interview with NPR's media reporter, David... Read More →

The Race Card Project Digs For The Truth About Race In America

Looking out over the multiracial crowd of more than 600 assembled at the University of Akron's E.J. Thomas Hall, journalist Michele Norris paused in her remarks to make a quick observation.  "Within my lifetime, a theater with this composition would be unheard of, if not illegal," she said, quickly adding, "And I'm not that old."    The former host of NPR's All Things Considered was brought to campus to discuss the growing acclaim of her latest venture, The Race Card Project. Norris, 52, revealed that the project—six-word submissions on race and identity—grew out of increasingly difficult conversations she had with her family on race and being black in America.   Born and raised in Minnesota, Norris was unaware of the collective "code of silence" her older relatives... Read More →

#NPRBlacksInTech Series Explores Racial Divide In Tech Industry

African-American tech insiders will talk about their work stories in a new series on National Public Radio’s Tell Me More. From Dec. 2 until Dec. 20, Twitter users can follow the #NPRBlacksInTech hashtag to follow a day-in-the-life of these "tech thinkers." Michel Martin, host of Tell Me More, expects this feature will broaden the conversation about who staffs the tech revolution. "'A Day in the Life' allows us to experience in real time the imprint that African-Americans are making on our country's STEM engine," Martin said. "The series throws open the door to the worlds of these highly important, but largely invisible, individuals."  Anjuan Simmons, who this year published the book “Minority Tech,” said he jumped at the chance to give others a glimpse of his work as a... Read More →

#HipHopEd = Science Mixed With Rap For An Ultimate Battle Of Skills

I defy gravity/I am stronger than any force/I am Brooklyn" This isn't a verse from one of Jay Z's latest records, but rather the first lines from a high school student's entry in the Science B.A.T.T.L.E.S. competition.  Students from nine New York City schools competed in June, part of a network of student rap contests that marry verbal dexterity with concepts from plate tectonics to Pluto.  These aren’t lectures but true competitions—students in Oakland, California, rapped about whether Rosalind Franklin was ripped off by James Watson and Francis Crick in their discovery of the architecture of DNA. Stage names were welcome—one student performed as "Double R Bars." Teachers encouraged adolescents to be energetic and creative as they rhymed lyrics on stage in front of family... Read More →

Why Do Black Babies Cost Less To Adopt?

When we first toured my daughter’s private school, I saw a little African-American girl toddling around. She was adorable with her short, curly Afro and cute pink bracelets that matched her pink sandals. I looked around for the girl’s mother and got a little nervous when I didn’t see any black women nearby. But then a slim white woman with short blonde hair swooped her up. She had been standing next to the little girl the whole time. Why did I assume that a black child would have a black parent? My assumption wasn’t too far from reality. Most recent data on private adoptions shows that most adoptive parents are white, and they tend to adopt white children. Last month, NPR’s “Race Card Project” reported on an uncomfortable aspect of adoption: in many cases, black children... Read More →
  • 2019 Winners Announced

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