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Tag Archives: Edwidge Danticat

REVIEW: “The Fire This Time: A New Generation Speaks About Race”

There are 108 tally marks on the cover of The Fire This Time, the new essay collection that brings forth 18 perspectives from a new generation of writers, working in the tradition of James Baldwin. Each mark represents a black life lost too soon, a visual representation of the urgency of #BlackLivesMatter. In the aftermath of George Zimmerman’s acquittal in 2013, Jesmyn Ward went to Twitter to share her frustration, but found the platform too ephemeral. She was much more struck by the pertinence of James Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time. Ward, editor of this anthology, decided she wanted a book that “would reckon with the fire of rage and despair and fierce protective love currently sweeping through the streets and campuses of America.” The results are mostly successful. The Fire Next... Read More →

The Artist As Activist: Author Edwidge Danticat In Cleveland

Edwidge Danticat began her remarks in Cleveland by drawing attention to another artist, the painter Jacob Lawrence, whose migration series was on display last year at the Museum of Modern Art. Danticat, who has family in Brooklyn, New York, said she often walked the long rectangular room, soaking in the art as a way to reflect on the massacre at Mother Emmanuel AME Church in Charlotte, South Carolina. “What kept me glued to these dark silhouettes is how beautifully and heartbreakingly Lawrence captured black bodies in motion, in transit, in danger, and in pain,” she said. “The bowed heads of the hungry and the curved backs of mourners helped the Great Migration to gain and keep its momentum, along with the promise of less abject poverty in the North, better educational... Read More →

Poet Richard Blanco And Activist Ruth Behar Work To Lift Cuba’s “Emotional Embargo”

Writer Ruth Behar and poet Richard Blanco have launched Bridges to/from Cuba, an ambitious collaborative fueled by 20 years of friendship. The duo has started an online forum for poets, authors and scholars to "lay bare the laughter and sorrow of being Cuban." As geopolitics shift, these two Cuban Americans call out for literature, writing, “For it is not simply a political and economic embargo that needs to be 'lifted,' but also the weight of an emotional embargo that has kept Cubans collectively holding their breath for over fifty years." The two are uniquely positioned to lead. Blanco, inaugural poet for President Barack Obama's second inauguration, has brought out two memoirs on his life as a young, gay, Latino immigrant. Born to Cuban-exiled parents and raised in Miami... Read More →

Jesmyn Ward Stresses Importance Of Telling Stories That Matter During Recent Visit To Cleveland

On a freezing, overcast March day, the writer Jesmyn Ward made her first foray to Cleveland.  She barely smiled as she stood behind a lectern in brown leather boots, red corduroy pants and a gray sweater set. Yet several in her audience at Cleveland Public Library murmured that the piercing, prepared remarks Ward read should be published immediately. Others were visibly moved and brimming with questions. Ward, 36, who won a National Book Award for her second novel, “Salvage the Bones,” spent the morning with Cleveland students from Glenville High School and the afternoon exploring the question of who is allowed to speak: “We all feel inadequate when faced with a blank page, an empty canvas or a silent instrument.  We must battle self-doubt or negative introspection with every... Read More →

Debating The Best Book Lists: Does Amazon’s “100 Books To Read In A Lifetime” Get It Right?

Wither the best book list? Inherently inane and crazy-making, these are also undeniably good conversation starters. Amazon has posted the latest iteration: its best “100 Books to Read in a Lifetime.” It includes two Anisfield-Wolf prize novels: Junot Diaz' “The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao” and Toni Morrison’s “Beloved," as well as James McBride’s memoir “The Color of Water.” Also on the list is the immortal “Invisible Man” from Ralph Ellison, which won an Anisfield-Wolf Landmark Achievement, and books by Anisfield-Wolf recipients Edwidge Danticat and Louise Erdrich. Of course, it is strange to see “Kitchen Confidential” make the cut, and the bizarre assertion that “Portnoy’s Complaint” is Philip “Roth at his finest.” The Amazon list tilts... Read More →

Edwidge Danticat Lends Her Pen To The Film, “Girl Rising”

It's something that most of us in America take for granted—the right to an education.  We don't think about what it must feel like to be denied one of the most basic rights, until events like the attempted assassination attempt of 14-year-old Malala Yousufzai at the hands of the Taliban puncture our collective consciousness. She was a vocal advocate for education for girls in Pakistan, who had dreams of becoming a doctor. While Malala will make a full recovery and return to her advocacy work, she is not alone in her fight for access to education.  The new film, "Girl Rising," explores the lives of nine young women around the world, each one fighting for a chance to get the education that is the key to their future. Presented by 10x10, a social action campaign, the film features nine... Read More →

VIDEO: Edwidge Danticat On Why Americans Don’t Know Haiti Beyond The Catastrophes

Watch Edwidge Danticat on the Struggle of Haitian Immigrants on PBS. See more from Need To Know. When we see Haiti in the news, it is often downtrodden and negative. Edwidge Danticant, our 2005 winner for fiction, tries to bring a different light to Haiti through her work. In a 2011 interview on PBS, shortly after the Haiti earthquake of 2010, Danticat talks about the side of Haiti we rarely get to see. "The beauty surprises people sometimes. The physical beauty of certain parts of Haiti, the beauty of the arts - the music, the paintings, the literature - that Haiti, I want people to also know"  Read More →

In A Disaster, Do People Need Books As Much As They Need Other Supplies?

Several Nobel laureates, Libraries Without Borders and dozens of authors believe so. They are petitioning for books to be considered crucial in disaster relief. Among those who have signed the petition are Anisfield-Wolf winners Toni Morrison, Junot Diaz, Joyce Carol Oates and Edwidge Danticat. Patrick Weil, chairman of Libraries Without Borders, says they are urging the UN to consider "nourishment of the mind" a fundamental resource in disaster relief. This first came about after the Haiti earthquake in 2010, when the organization was contacted about rebuilding a destroyed library.  Weil said:  "The first priority is life, but when life is secure, what can people do if they are staying in a camp? They cannot do anything, and they can become depressed. Once life is secured... Read More →

VIDEO: Edwidge Danticat Explains What It Means To Be An Immigrant Artist

"There's no one writing in the English language today who more precisely and passionately articulates the exile's experience than Edwidge Danticat." And so begins Henry Louis Gates' introduction of our 2005 winner. In this 2012 video, Danticat discusses her work and exile, what it means to be an immigrant artist, and responsibility to one's home country. This event was co-presented by Cambridge Forum, Harvard Bookstore, and Harvard's W.E.B. Du Bois Institute. Read More →

VIDEO: Edwidge Danticat On Whether Art Is A Luxury Or Necessity

2005 Anisfield-Wolf winner Edwidge Danticat visited the Tavis Smiley show on PBS to discuss her latest work, Create Dangerously. She discusses the origins of the book's title, the difference between immigrant artists and American-born artists, and whether art should be considered a luxury or necessity. Read More →
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