It appears you are using an older browser. This site is optimized for modern browsers.
To get more out of your browsing experience upgrade your browser.

Adamic · Adichie · Alexander · Ali · Allen · Allende · Appiah · Asch · Bahnimptewa · Baldry · Banks · Bartlett · Baughman · Beckwith · Bell · Berlin · Berry · Blight · Braithwaite · Branch · Breytenbach · Bronfenbrenner · Brooks · Brown · Brown · Carter · Carter · Cayton · Chase · Chin · Cisneros · Clifton · Cofer · Cohn · Coles · Collier · Collins · Conroy · Dahlstrom · Danticat · Davidson · Davies · Davis · Dawidowicz · Dean · Deloria Jr. · Demby · Derricotte · Díaz · Dinnerstein · Dobzhansky · Downs · Drake · Duguid · Dumond · Dunn · Edugyan · Ellison · Eltis · Erdrich · Fabre · Faderman · Fernandes · Field · Fineberg · Fisher · Fladeland · Foxx · Franch · Franklin · Frazier · Fredrickson · Freyre · Furnas · Gaines · Gates Jr. · Genovese · Gibbons · Gibbs · Gimbutas · Girdner · Glazer · Gloria · Gordimer · Gordon · Gordon-Reed · Gosnell · Graham · Graham · Greene · Griffin · Haddon · Haley · Haller Jr. · Hamid · Harris · Hayes, ed. · Hedden · Hersey · Highwater · Hilberg · Holmes · Honour · Huddleston · Hughes · Hunt · Hurston · Huxley · Infeld · Isaacs · Jackson · James · Jess · Jones · Jones · Jordan · Jordan Jr. · July · Kahler · Kelley · Kendrick · Kennedy · Kibbe · Kiernan · Kincaid · King Jr. · Kingston · Kluger · Kozol · Krauss · Laming · Le · LeBlanc · Lee · Lee · Lepore · Levine · Lewis · Lewis · Lewis · Leyburn · Lipsitz · Loftis · Lomax · Loye · Lurie · Mabee · Mahajan · Marra · Marshall · Matejka · McBride · McPherson · Meeker · Mensh · Mensh · Mokgatle · Morris · Morris Jr. · Morrison · Mosley · Mowat · Moynihan · Murray · Myrdal · Nelli · Nelson · North · Olson · Ottley · Parks · Patai · Paton · Patterson · Phillips · Poliakov · Powell · Power · Powers · Rainwater · Rampersad · Richardson · Robinson · Rodriguez · Rosen · Sachar · Sachs · Said · Saitoti · Sams · Samuel · Saunders · Scheinfeld · Seibert · Shamsie · Shavit · Sheehy · Shepherd Jr. · Shetterly · Silver · Simpson · Smith · Smith · Snyder · Solomon · South African Institute of Race Relations · Soyinka · Staples · Stefaniak · Stegner with the editors of Look · Steiner · Sutton · Suyin · Takaki · Thernstrom · Tobias, ed. · Toole · Tucker · van der Post · Vazirani · Walcott · Wallace · Waniek · Ward · Weglyn · West · Whitehead · Wideman · Wilkerson · Wilson · Wilson · Winfrey · Wing · Wood · Wright · Wright · Wyman · X · Yinger

Monthly Archives: February 2014

Will “My Brother’s Keeper” Be Obama’s Lasting Legacy?

During January's State of the Union address, President Obama included one sentence midway through his remarks that didn't receive much attention during the post-speech analysis: "And I'm reaching out to some of America's leading foundations and corporations on a new initiative to help more young men of color facing especially tough odds stay on track and reach their full potential."    Today the White House is expanding on that sentence and launching its new initiative, "My Brother's Keeper," aimed at providing more services for young African-American and Hispanic men to address and the social, economic and judicial disparities.    White House officials identified several focus areas for the initiative: solving inequalities within schools and the criminal justice system, increasing... Read More →

Host Of The Internet’s Most Lively Dinner Party, Ta-Nehisi Coates Commands The Room

At 38, Ta-Nehisi Coates, senior correspondent for The Atlantic's online property, has become one of the nation's foremost writers on race and culture. On a recent Saturday afternoon, Coates (whose first name is pronounced Tah-Nuh-Hah-See) found himself on stage at the Cleveland Public Library before a large, diverse crowd that included students from the all-male Ginn Academy, a Cleveland public high school. The boys created a crimson line in the audience in their signature red blazers. Despite the formal setting, Coates was quick to share his humble beginnings. Born in West Baltimore, he came of age in "the era where black boys died," he said. Drugs and violence decimated entire communities, but Coates said his saving grace was his parents' strict guidance. His father, Paul Coates, was... Read More →

“Bartlett’s Familiar Black Quotations” Invites Readers To Do A Deeper Dive Into African-American History

Retha Powers, the editor of the magnificent and addictive new “Bartlett’s Familiar Black Quotations,” has a handful of all-time favorite sayings, or “micro-histories,” as she calls them. One is from the author of the foreword to her book, Henry Louis Gates, Jr.: I rebel at the notion that I can’t be part of other groups, that I can’t construct identities through elective affinity, that race must be the most important thing about me. Is that what I want on my gravestone: Here lies an African American? So I’m divided. I want to be black, to know black, to luxuriate in whatever I might be calling blackness at any particular time — but to do so in order to come out the other side, to experience a humanity that is neither colorless nor reducible to color. Bach and James... Read More →

VIDEO: David Livingstone Smith On The Delusion Of Race

Philosophy Professor David Livingstone Smith kicked off the University of New England's 2014 diversity lecture series with a talk on why "race" is a destructive concept. The 2012 Anisfield-Wolf nonfiction award winner for “Less Than Human: Why We Demean, Enslave and Exterminate Others” stated his mission at the top: "I wish to liberate you. I do not think I will succeed, but I hope I will raise questions about certain beliefs you take for granted." Smith presented his audience with a slide of four individuals with light skin and typical European facial features. He then asked the audience if they could determine which two were, in fact, African-American. It proved puzzling for those assembled. (See the slide here.) "Virtually every genocide that I know enough about has been a... Read More →

Tim Wise’s Attitudes On Race Resonate With University Of Akron Crowd

Anti-racism activist Tim Wise joked that he was on his third visit to the University of Akron campus in the past 15 years and was pleased to see the audience increase each time.  Wise, 45, opened the evening by taking note of his privilege as a middle-class, college-educated, heterosexual white man. "I'm here because I fit the aesthetic for what's necessary for white people to talk about racism in America," he boomed. "People of color get up and say it all the time, but they get ignored. The real measure of post-racial America is when a black person can stand here and receive the same reception I do."   Acknowledging his privilege is the cornerstone of Wise's career. Born in Nashville, Tennessee, he received his B.A. from Tulane University, where he led an anti-apartheid student... Read More →

Rita Dove Lauded In New Documentary On Her Formative Years

Filmmaker Eduardo Montes-Bradley knew he wanted to make a film on Rita Dove. So the director of documentaries on former NAACP chairman Julian Bond and revolutionary Che Guevara decided to finance the project out of his own pockets. "To have someone like Rita Dove expressing herself in generational terms by talking about her father and grandfather in her poetry was, to me, like a triple jackpot," the Virginia-based filmmaker said. "I got the writer I was looking for. I got the story I was looking for, and I had it all right here at home."  The result is "Rita Dove: An American Poet" built from family photos, home videos and interviews with its subject  Montes-Bradley explores the former poet laureate's formative years and asks how a girl from Akron, Ohio, became one of the most... Read More →

Debating The Best Book Lists: Does Amazon’s “100 Books To Read In A Lifetime” Get It Right?

Wither the best book list? Inherently inane and crazy-making, these are also undeniably good conversation starters. Amazon has posted the latest iteration: its best “100 Books to Read in a Lifetime.” It includes two Anisfield-Wolf prize novels: Junot Diaz' “The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao” and Toni Morrison’s “Beloved," as well as James McBride’s memoir “The Color of Water.” Also on the list is the immortal “Invisible Man” from Ralph Ellison, which won an Anisfield-Wolf Landmark Achievement, and books by Anisfield-Wolf recipients Edwidge Danticat and Louise Erdrich. Of course, it is strange to see “Kitchen Confidential” make the cut, and the bizarre assertion that “Portnoy’s Complaint” is Philip “Roth at his finest.” The Amazon list tilts... Read More →

Black Male Achievement Takes Center Stage In New Documentary, “American Promise”

From left to right: Idris Brewster, Miles Brewster, Joe Brewster. When 13-year-old Idris Brewster, subject of the thought-provoking documentary "American Promise," is invited to a classmate's bat mitzvah, he says he hasn’t much interest. None of the girls ever want to dance with him, and he has a good idea why. "I bet if I was white, I'd be better off," he says plainly. His parents, filmmakers Joe Brewster and Michele Stephenson, are sitting off camera. They let the moment land. Such incidents occur often in the two-hour film, which follows Idris and his best friend Seun Summers for 13 years at The Dalton School, a prestigious college preparatory institution in Manhattan. The documentary premiered on PBS in February and is available to viewers on the PBS website until March 6, 2014... Read More →

The Race Card Project Digs For The Truth About Race In America

Looking out over the multiracial crowd of more than 600 assembled at the University of Akron's E.J. Thomas Hall, journalist Michele Norris paused in her remarks to make a quick observation.  "Within my lifetime, a theater with this composition would be unheard of, if not illegal," she said, quickly adding, "And I'm not that old."    The former host of NPR's All Things Considered was brought to campus to discuss the growing acclaim of her latest venture, The Race Card Project. Norris, 52, revealed that the project—six-word submissions on race and identity—grew out of increasingly difficult conversations she had with her family on race and being black in America.   Born and raised in Minnesota, Norris was unaware of the collective "code of silence" her older relatives... Read More →
↑ Back to Top